Baby Lawyer and Pistol Enthusiastic

When I was asked to write an article for “Life in GED” after my participation to the France Pistol Shooting Championship, I did not know what I could say about it.

I could spend days discussing about my own discipline, as every passionate athlete, but it would not be of great interest for my fellow undergraduates.

cecile

Cécile LESCARRET (GED2)

I would rather share what it has brought to my everyday life. Michel Cacheux, a wonderful coach and former member of the French national Shooting Team, once told me that to succeed a high-level athlete has to keep in mind five elements: Rules, Mental, Physical fitness, Strategy and Tactics.

I find this analysis quite alike the requirements a student should bear in mind for the finals. Everyone has to abide by the same rules in order to participate. Every athlete should be in the best shape possible (yes, even in pistol shooting I assure you) and in a positive and lucid mental state to perform. Moreover, an athlete needs to be strategic, knowing one’s strengths and weaknesses allows to have a lucid look on events occurring during a match and to fix what has to be fixed immediately. Finally, every athlete has little tricks that helps and reassures: drinking, munching, meditation… Every little tip providing some comfort may make all the difference in hard times.

But besides, being passionate is about having fun, push ambitions to the limits, always having faith and not being afraid to step back sometimes to reach the next level.

I am not the only passionate in the “Grande Ecole du Droit”, many of us have consuming passions. Some play music, some swim, some act, some even fight on a tatami! We all face the same joys, doubts and fears. We are all torn apart between our studies, our personal life and our passions.

elina

Elina ROUGEAU (GED2)

How do we manage to conciliate everything? I am going to tell you a secret… It is impossible! We do the best we can, but we are only humans after all. Sometimes, choices must be made. That means cancelling an event with friends to finish an assignment because you had to attend a training session before a competition. That means having to train at night or having to space the practice sessions and finding ways to compensate such as mental visualization. That means sacrifices.

But it is all worth it. More than a passion, after 8 years of practice, pistol shooting has become a genuine necessity. Trainings evacuate stress and competitions provide thrilling sensations but above all, the people I have met have contributed in the making of the person I am today.

claire-emeline

Claire Emeline AUDUC (GED1)

Through this article, I want to urge readers to believe in their dreams, no matter how hard it can be, as the song says, “ain’t no mountain high enough”.

Cécile LESCARRET