Admission Day : Chapter 2

Exactly one year ago, 28 of us were hopeful high school students, coming to Jean Monnet for the first time as candidates to the first GED Admission Auditions ever.
On Saturday, May the 20th 2017 the second edition of this admission day took place.
The previous team in charge of the organization had done a really good job, making the day a real success. Since the bar had been set so high, the main question was the following one: how could we welcome our future fellow students even better?

The task was given to a group of 2nd year students, led by Hortense Derrien (Ariane Edery, Blandine d’Humières, Flora Merret, Nina Ravine). Two first year students were added to this team (Mathis Aubry-Lallement, Claire-Emeline Auduc). All of them were granted the advice of the original team (Adrien Aing, Julien Blavot Goujon, Erwann Le Noac’h, Wassim Mokadem). This way, we could pursue what had already been accomplished last year. In addition, we were taking into account the former candidates’ ideas and remarks.

We started by making a clear list of what had to be done and how the day would be organized. Professor Magnier had selected the students who were to be auditioned from APB and we had to contact them and organize the auditions. Just like last year, the admission would be decided upon 2 auditions. One occurred in front of a “little” jury made of students whereas the other, more formal, was compounded of alumni and teachers. We were glad a lot of former GED students accepted to come. The grand jury was carried out by Pierre Delassis, representing the alumni.

Elaborating a running order required the exchange of several emails with the candidates because it often depended on their availabilities. The team took the time to make it perfect, which was necessary because we wanted to avoid any delay which would have jeopardized our all organization.

Sticking to the timetable was the main demand made by the GED1. Indeed, our goal for this year was basically to take the basis of last year work but with a little more organization.

Once we had the GED1’ opinions, we knew what was to be improved. For example, the “pre-coaching” set to put the candidates in the mood by explaining a few things before the actual auditions had to be kept because of how helpful it had been the previous year. We also decided to define roles for every student to occupy during the day: welcome the students, pre-coaching, visits, digital team, juries, bake sales… A major improvement was also the room specifically arranged to welcome the parents. GED students were always there to answer questions or simply discuss with them, which was appreciated.

Most of the parents appreciated the fact that they learnt about the course thanks to the talks given by Maitre Baller and Pierre Delassis in the amphitheater, and that they could also speak directly with the students.

[…] Once arrived, I was amazed by the great organization and most importantly by the kindness and helpfulness of the students. Answering all our questions, and really concerned about how it went. […] I also considered the exchange with the members of the jury as an instructive experience and fruitful discussion regarding the future of the course and what we can personally bring to it. In conclusion, it attracted me even more and confirmed me into thinking this is what I want to do later.
A candidate to the Grande Ecole du Droit.

Ged admission day  GED1 students discussing with candidates in the pre-coaching room.
© Ghislena Ly/ Audrey Ailloud

 
Another point we put a lot of thoughts in was the bake cake. Last year, a lunch had been prepared but not everyone was aware of it and it was somehow served a little late. This year, we decided to have everyone participate in the sale. In addition, the team made sandwiches in the morning. Almost everything was sold out and the remaining sandwiches were given to homeless people in the evening.

Among the different roles we had defined, one consisted in waiting at the station to guide the candidates towards the university. But we soon realized it was useless, the families being already informed thanks to the signs we had put the day before. It was satisfying to see we had thought of everything, even though it seemed excessive sometimes. The goal for next year is thus to find a balance to make the day even more dynamic.

As part of the creation of the “Journée des Oraux” in 2016, I was offered another chance to help find out the GED 1 of tomorrow thanks to my presence in the Selection Juries. Hence, I felt glad and very pleased to see that the big project my teammates and I left incomplete evolved into something really amazing, something that made our directors very proud and the students dreamy. Now, let’s hope that the next generation will also be glad to be part of the great adventure of La Grande Ecole du Droit!
– Julien Blavot-Goujon, member of the 2016 organization team

At the end of the day, the task left was maybe the most important. Maître Baller and the juries gathered in a room where they exchanged their views and finally, 30 names emerged.

We look forward to meeting them and we hope they enjoyed the experience as much as we did. See you next year!

Organizing this day was our way to contribute to developing the Grande Ecole du Droit. The general mobilization shows how committed every student is to improve the quality of our formation.
– Hortense Derrien, leader of the 2017 organization team

ged organisatPart of the organization team (Claire-Emeline Auduc, Mathis Aubry—Lallement, Hortense Derrien, Flora Merret, Léa Jouannin)

NB: we would like to thank the university, Professor Magnier, Maitre Baller, Pierre Delassis and all the students (former and current) for coming and being so effective.

 

Claire-Emeline Auduc (GED2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working with Transparency International France

A few days ago, I was reading the news and among all the titles, one in particular caught my attention: « The presidential candidates respond to the 11 recommendations made by the NGO Transparency International France. » Can you believe that students in second and third year of the Grande Ecole du Droit had participated in the elaboration of these recommendations?I was one of them and I can tell you that it was one of the most enriching experiences I have ever taken part in.

TIF2During the first semester, Professor Magnier offered some students the chance to work on a project with the French section of the German NGO Transparency International, known for leading the fight against corruption and driven by a vision of a world in which states, businesses, civil society and individuals in their daily lives would be spared with corruption in all its forms.

The issue of transparence already concerned my classmates and me, and I immediately knew that it was a great opportunity for us to embark in such a project. As I am a quite discreet student, I was not expecting to be responsible for the coordination of the mission. However, since I joined the Grande Ecole du Droit, I was confronted to a lot of opportunities that helped me grow and evolve. This experience was one of them.

For the upcoming presidential elections, Transparency international France launched a campaign in order to ask the candidates to commit to the 11 recommendations if they were elected. The recommendations of course dealt with the issue of public life transparence, therefore we particularly worked on the participation of citizens. We were asked to make a comparative study of the different legislations adopted by European countries, North America and even Asia, with Taiwan regarding two mains themes: the right of citizen petition and the mechanisms for citizen consultation prior to projects or bills. We were fortunate to work with Ms Bounaud, general delegate of Transparency International France, who is a great person with convictions.

After some long hours of research, I am proud to say that we met the challenge.

This experience has allowed us to gain a more concrete approach regarding the field of comparative law and the work with an NGO. Indeed, this mission has taught us the progress and shortcomings in this area between the countries studied. As citizens and law students, we were very proud to have been able to participate in this work, which was useful for the modernization of democratic life.

As you can imagine, we will of course continue to work with Transparency, in order to spread the issue of transparence that every societies have to overcome.

In this way, we invited Ms Bounaud during a conference where she presented the 11 presidential recommendations to the law students of our university. I assume they were quite interested about how we can improve the transparence of public life, especially on this time of presidential election in France.

We also had the chance to attend the yearly volunteers meeting. We were impressed by the number of new volunteers who wanted to join the association. As a matter of fact, they were mostly from law background such as law student, law teachers, former judge of the Cour de cassation but there were also people working in private sectors.

We realized that all these people wanted to improve the society as some of witnessed corruption during their work. We understood that corruption was an issue that society have to deal with, which is not only present in public life, but also in universities or private companies.

This meeting clearly motivated us to help Transparency in the new mission they have given us, consisting in developing information sheets about some concept of law for the general public. Being able to put into practice our legal knowledge to support a worthy cause is something that we are all proud of.

We are thankful to our director Professor Magnier and Ms Bounaud from T.I France for this amazing experience.

TIF

We invite you to visit the website of Transparency international France: https://transparency-france.org/

The 11 recommendations to the presidential candidates: https://transparency-france.org/recommandations-presidentielle-2017/

The presidential candidates who responded to the 11 recommendations : https://transparency-france.org/project/23032017-transparenceethique-de-vie-publique-candidats-sengagent/

Don’t hesitate to support them!

Hind El Khalfi & Mathilde Floréan (GED2)

Conference about Northwestern University in Chicago

We were very lucky to welcome on Tuesday, February 21th 2017, James B. Speta, professor of Law at Northwestern Pritzker School of law in Chicago, and senior associate Dean for Academic Affairs and International Initiatives at Jean Monnet University. He presented legal education in the United States, more specifically in Northwestern University and the life in Chicago.

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James B. Speta, Professor at Northwestern Pritzker School of law in Chicago

How is the Legal education in the United States?

At the very beginning of his presentation, before we had the time to ask any questions, James B. Speta answered the question we were all willing to ask: Why is education in the United States so expensive? He said that education was expensive in the United States because education was not regarded as a basic right, and their politics work differently than in France, where education is free.

He also told us there are 200 law schools accredited by the bar association right now in the United States.

Generally speaking, the number of JD student is going down, and the number of students doing the LLM is going up. Juris doctor, commonly abbreviated J.D., is the degree commonly conferred by law schools. It is required in most of the states to gain Admission to the Bar. The LLM is a master of Law.

But LLM programs are not regulated by the bar association. That’s why there are many differences between programs: which can be general or more specific, classes: mixed with JD students or not?

What about Northwestern University?

In Northwestern, classes can go up to 65 students but actually most classes have only 20 to 30 students. The university integrated multidisciplinary courses in order to make lawyers ready to practice at the time they graduate. Northwestern has a wide range of degree programs. For instance, they propose a wide selection of business courses. The university uses the great legal community of Chicago to have the best education for their students, in addition they work very closely with business school such as Kellogg School of Management. Law and MBA students share the same education. For example, they follow courses such as contract drafting and structuring transactions.

The University has LLM programs since 1932. They build up a dedicated team of professionals to ensure personalized accompaniment. LLM program costs around 60 to 63 thousand dollars. The university receives around 115 students per year. To be admitted into Northwestern, recruiters are concerned about where the student studied, if the student had great marks, if the student had a high IELTS score and they are also sensitive to students who have ambitions and have a professional experience. LLM and JD students are in class together. James B. Speta believes it is enriching for both. Northwestern tries to integrate students very quickly by making events, parties and other activities that allow students from all around the world to meet and discover new cultures. For example, they organise a big soccer game between Northwestern University and Chicago University. They have a campus which is shared between students from Northwestern and students from the medical school and the hospital. It is nice to know that they also propose a scholarship that can go up to a quarter of the annual tuition of the LLM program. Scholarship criteria are merit, need and geographic diversity.

Most of the students take the New York bar after their year passed in the LLM program, the overall pass rate is 35%, but for Northwestern the rate is about 65 to 70%. Graduating to the bar exam after a year in a LLM program actually depends on the degree of seriousness of the student about the bar and if he attends a bar review course and goes all the way through it. The challenge is often between choosing courses they need to learn for the bar exam and the courses they want to learn.

It is interesting to know that the University proposes a new summer program of 4 months, which allows people to validate a LLM in a shorter time, although it is mainly made for lawyers who can’t leave work during an all year but want to complete their formation with a LLM.

How is the life in Chicago?

The University is in the downtown of Chicago, it is close to law firms and libraries. Unlike New York, Chicago preserves some serenity there is a lake and a bike path near the University.

James B. Speta reassured us about the “violence reputed in Chicago”. He said that there are violence, like everywhere, but not around the law school. It is a safe environment. Universities must respect the “Clery act”: which requires all colleges and universities that participate in federal financial aid programs to keep and disclose information about crime on and near their respective campuses.

It is easy to find apartments if students don’t want to live in the campus.

In general, it is not a cheap city but it is cheaper than New York or Paris.

Chicago is reputed to be a great sports city: hockey, soccer and football are very popular.

Chicago is a great place to study law because it is a business centre, people easily get in contact with alumni who can help them out if they need it and create a great network.

Personally, I’m only in my first year at the “Grande Ecole du Droit”. But one of the main reason I chose this formation is the LLM. Indeed I studied in Canada and in New Zealand when I was younger and above the great improvement of my English, it was an incredible enriching experience that I’m willing to repeat! I have a little preference for the United States, so I was very happy and honoured to receive the professor James B. Speta in our University, in order to have a specialist presenting us more precisely what a LLM consisted in and it was the occasion to discover particularly the University of Northwestern. I was a little bit concerned about the annual cost of the study and the possibility to obtain a visa with the arrival of the new president of the United States, Donald Trump. However, I was particularly attracted by the fact that students could pass the New York bar exam after their LLM.

Chloé Nateghi,

First year student at the “Grande Ecole du Droit”

Lysias Sceaux 2017: Our memorable experience!

lysias 2017

©Christophe Rabinovici

How to combine the useful with the pleasant ? The task can sometimes appear arduous. The so hoped conciliation can seem impossible, but every time it is reached it provides a considerable pleasure. By this expression, Horace, in L’Art Poétique, tries to enjoin his reader to find the balance between pleasing and instructing. This teaching seems as relevant in poetry as it is in pleading.

Yes, readers, it is a matter of pleading which will be discussed in this article. Especially the Lysias contest. The Lysias contest is a pleading and juridical eloquence competition organized each year in the Jean Monnet university. It allows students to try out this complex exercise while having fun in a kind and convivial atmosphere. From the beginning, I was very excited by this contest because I thought it was an interesting and innovative concept. Moreover, I had stopped acting after 5 years of practice so it was for me the opportunity to find back the ability to express myself and the sensations I used to get when acting.

This experience was particularly rewarding and I fully benefited from it. This contest allowed me to discover this famous exercise which is so specific to the profession of lawyer that attracts me particularly. It was also the occasion to take part in an activity other than my classes but still very close to Law.

This exercise is very formative because it allows to train for the academic practical cases but also leaves a large place to personal references and humor. This, I found very interesting because it allowed me to discover everyone’s personality through the way each students chose to tackle the subjects. Indeed, I believe there’s a part of our universe, our personality and our sensitivity that we share in every pleading. I think this experience can only be positive. It is a great opportunity to improve our fluency and oral skills and above all it brings a lot of confidence. I took a lot of pleasure in pleading because it is a very special and very exhilarating moment. But I also appreciated the preliminary work and the legal researches necessary to answer the subjects.

Furthermore, being able to present my work in front of such well-known personalities in the world of Law was very rewarding. The constructive criticism I received brought me a lot and I could note a real progress at each stage of the competition.The finale was a particularly exciting moment. Pleading, in a robe moreover, in front of a jury of such great quality, as well as in front of my friends and family was a tremendous experience. I look forward to continuing my journey at National level.

The Lysias Competition enjoys a growing enthusiasm in the faculty and the association does a remarkable work to offer this great opportunity. The Lysias adventure is an incredible experience and I warmly invite everyone to take the plunge!

Mathis (GED1)

Mathis

©Christophe Rabinovici

If speaking in public and doing lyrical flights like Bertrand Périer seems to be easy an natural for some people, the first step is sometimes hard to cross. It was with hesitation and above all, curiosity (and on a whim), that I signed up to the annual Lysias Sceaux competition. After applying, some doubts arrived, will I succeed? Will I be inspired by the subject? Where to start? Will I be able to balance this with my classes? So much questions that made me wonder: « Why did I apply? »

Then, the civil plea subject arrived and it was time to write. Interesting topics with amazing stories awake our overflowing imagination and all the excitation that goes with it. We see ourselves in the shoes of an investigator, of a lawyer, searching for every loophole in the plea of our opponent, every possible and imaginable explanation to defend our side the best. Each word, detail and interpretation of the subject allows us to make incredible, entertaining and surprising pleas all different from each other.

If the written part is an enjoyment, the oral part is even more exciting. Thanks to Stéphane Baller’s soft skills courses, public speaking and stress mastery were less difficult to me. Some of his tips remained in my head such as not opening my mouth if it’s to say « euh », taking a deep breath, playing with the tone or searching for eye contact, so much pieces of advice that I’m repeating to myself endlessly.

My name has been called, a horde of look is staring at me, my stomach is having butterflies and my hands are becoming shaky. I get up, my heart is beating wildly, I take a deep breath, say to myself « Time to shine », and I rush forward the plea impetus. Little by little, the hesitation of the first words gives way to the speech impulse, the plea becomes fluent, gestures are flying away and the pleasure of pleading, of convincing is sensational. The smiles, the laughs and the applause are resounding and these are to my mind the best reward that we can ever get from the public. It’s through my point of view and my feeling that I’ve shared my Lysias’ experience with you. If the non-participation isn’t such a big deal, taking part in Lysias is still an amazing life experience full of challenges, doubts, unforeseen events and first and foremost an enriching and unique experience that I can only recommend you.
Finally, the most important thing is to enjoy the written part as much as the oral part, to live delightful moments with the passion of words and to surpass oneself on unexpected horizons.

Ghisléna (GED1)

A legal internship in Italy: observations on Italian and comparative Law

This summer, I decided to combine both my desire to travel and my desire to do an internship, so I figured a good compromise would be a legal internship in a foreign country. I had an opportunity to do an internship in an Italian Law firm in Italy, and speaking Italian was a real prerequisite.

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This experience was really rewarding linguistically and culturally speaking, but it is on the legal aspect that I would like to focus as a Comparative Law student from the “Grande Ecole du Droit”. Continue reading

My summer internship… in the US

 

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Tom, President of the AEGED, at an EY event © Christophe Rabinovici

As you probably know, the Grande Ecole du Droit program has two objectives: preparing students for an LL.M in their fourth year and also for their future arrival on the job market. Thus, our courses are very diverse: US Contract Law, Tort Law, American Constitutional Law, seminars on project management and public speaking… However, I quickly started asking myself: is our French and Anglo-American background really enough for us to study and work abroad? So I decided to apply for an internship in the United States.

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A day to change 30 destinies

This year marked for the Grande Ecole du Droit a key point in the evolution of the selection process of its future first-year students. Indeed, Professor Véronique Magnier, head of the course, decided to create a new step in this selection by setting up an admission day, where candidates would be auditioned. Thus, they would be selected, not only on the criterion of their academic results, but also thanks to their personality and their motivation. Encouraged by Professor Magnier, a small group of four second-year students took the gamble to organize this special day.

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Professor Véronique Magnier, head of the “GED” © Christophe Rabinovici

Organization of the oral interviews day

Everything began when Erwann asked us if we would be motivated to organize this admission day in the context of the class «Gestion de Projet», taught by Maître Stephane Baller, partner lawyer at EY Société d’Avocats. Although we were aware that it would be far from easy to make the day perfect, we never expected such an amount of work for the preparation. Indeed, about 120 high-school pupils were expected to be auditioned. This meant a lot of preparation, mostly administrative procedures: renting classrooms and amphitheaters, opening access to the parking of the Faculty and mailing the convocations.

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Finding an internship for the summer

Every year, “Grande Ecole du Droit” students do everything in their power to find an internship. Two of us are going to share our story.

An internship at the Cabinet Claire Bonnet

Finding an internship is maybe one of the hardest and most stressful tasks of a student life even for “Grande Ecole du Droit” students who are well prepared by Maître Stephan Baller.

When I started to think about finding an internship (in the beginning of September) I had two “strategies” in mind. I know, I’m a bit too organized…

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Manon Bourdin at an EY event © Christophe Rabinovici

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The afterworks are back !

Afterwork © Christophe Rapinovici

The GED students at the afterwork © Christophe Rabinovici

Last tests are being made on the microphone. Latercomers tiptoe into the room. It’s time for everyone to take a seat. It’s time for the first afterwork of 2016 to start. The afterworks are becoming a custom for the GED student. It’s an evening to meet and exchange with professionals. Of course, an afterwork wouldn’t be complete without a buffet where the students can learn the value of networking. But the concept itself underwent some transformations. Five GED students (Opale Malet, Manon Bourdin, Chloé Dumont, Flora Boillaut and myself) indeed worked on the afterworks project for several months in order to get it back on feet again.

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My interview with Boston University

“Breath, relax, you have nothing to be nervous about”. Those are the first words the member of the admissions committee at Boston University (BU) told me when I called him for my interview. Indeed, as part of the LL.M application process, universities may require it as the final step before giving you their decision. The interview is supposed to last from 20 to 30 minutes and is described as a chance for the admission committee to learn about our interests and plans for study but is also an opportunity for us to ask all our questions.

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Mai Le Van will be going to the United States next September in order to attend an LL.M. program – © Christophe Rabinovici

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