The Economist Rapper

When I learnt that every second-year student from the Grande École du Droit would be following a new « Economy and Corporation management » course, taught by Jean-Philippe Denis, a renowned teacher, I must admit that I was rather skeptical at first. Indeed, I did not think it would be very useful for the law students that we are. Besides, as I did not like this subject when I was in high school, I feared that the course would be boring. And I was completely wrong.

GED2

All GED2, Véronique Magnier and Stéphane Baller   ©Christophe Rabinovici

Indeed, this course was not about calculating the GDP of a given country, or measuring the impact of an economic phenomenon on a given population, such as indebtedness. We had to think about abstract issues which are key to understand economy and its deep, yet hidden, relationship with law. We became aware that we were all part of a lot of different organizations: a friendship, our university, the economic market… You may wonder how is this statement related to economy and law, but the answer is very simple: it appears obvious that organizations are first imagined in abstracto. Once they are realized and “built”, it is up to the law, and to the rules it provides, to become their pillar and to ensure it does not collapse through regulations.

I can certainly understand that you might feel a little lost right now, as I was lost myself at the beginning of the class! However, this kind of conceptual elements are essential to understand how the “baby lawyers” that we are must deal with legal issues in our everyday life.

Now that I have made a little overview of the purely academic content of the course, I must talk about the most interesting part, which is… the professor and his innovative pedagogy! In order to give you an insight of his personality, I will give you a little fun fact : Professor Denis is very famous in France for having chosen a quote from the French rapper Booba as an exam subject (yes, a rap song as an exam)! In class, he frequently referred to French and American rappers, such as Jay-Z, to explain the notions, and he often showed us movies and videos to support his arguments. We understood that economy (and law) were absolutely everywhere, even in Hollywood movies. We were offered another way to perceive law and the world around us, and I think it is a real advantage of the GED.

The exam was very thrilling and stimulating as well. Professor Denis asked us to write a kind of article about the “Kerviel Case”, that we had to present in front of the class. Jérôme Kerviel was a trader accused of diverting funds from the “Société Générale”, who was discharged in September. In order to motivate us for this difficult task (and I assure you that it truly was), he told us that the best paper would be published on The Conversation, a real research website. You can imagine that it is much more rewarding than a good grade! And … I am quite proud to say that our group, composed of Ariane EDERY, Nina Ravine VA and I won!

This task was really challenging, perhaps the most difficult of the entire semester, but I thought it was extremely interesting to make us look at a case from another point of view.

Overall, although I was really doubtful at the beginning of the year, this course was the one I believe to be the most interesting and the most useful in the whole semester, as it helped us to form a legal reasoning in a totally different way from any other lecture, and any GED student should realize how lucky he is to have such a good teacher!

Timothée FORET (GED2)

The welcoming of a new “GEDeration”

Last year, we decided to build a team in order to start organising the huge orientation week-end! Once the team was constituted, we had one initial objective: finding the best place to welcome the new “Grande Ecole du Droit” students. After long hours of research, we finally found a perfect cottage located in the French countryside, two hours away from Paris. During the summer, several meetings were organised to plan all the activities and the way the week-end should progress. Continue reading

My internship at Eversheds

On August 3rd I was entering the Eversheds LLP’s Parisian office to begin my internship. The opportunity of doing an internship in such a big firm was given to me thanks to one of the Principal Associates, one of my parents’ friend. As I am currently a third year law student, I was scared not to meet the expectations of Eversheds. Fortunately, as the days went on I was given the chance to discover a real insight of the every day routine of business lawyers.

Anne-Isabelle (second row, in the middle) enjoying her vacation with the GED in Lisbon (Portugal) before the internship - May 2015

Anne-Isabelle (second row, in the middle) enjoying her vacation with the GED in Lisbon (Portugal) before her internship – May 2015

I did my internship in the Corporate department of the firm. The first thought I had when I entered the offices was: “Well, Corporate department… Fine, but I have never really studied Corporate Law!” In fact, French law students only discover Corporate Law during their LLB. However no one but me seemed to worry about it.

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From Pills to Bills: former Med School students in the GED

Flora, Mai and Thanutsika (then abbreviated to “Thanu”) are second year students of the Grande Ecole du Droit. They accepted to answer our questions and to share with us their experience of becoming a GED student after medical studies.

Mai

Mai “Law was an evidence” – © Christophe Rabinovici

Why did you choose to study law after medicine?

Flora chose Law school after medicine because she needed “to join a degree course where there are a lot of different interesting courses yet remaining really general, not one specialty only”. She explains it was because she liked “the diversity of courses and the panel of choices in medicine studies”.

Mai said that she had always hesitated between law school and medical school. However, after a bachelor’s degree in science she thought medical school was the more obvious choice. But when medical school didn’t work out for her, she did not even hesitate to choose what to do next: “Law school was an evidence”.

Thanu explained: “At the end of the year, I thought of what I wanted to do after, and I realized that nothing really interested me in the field of science apart from medical school. I considered doing a degree in biology like many others after failing the competitive exam but I didn’t really see myself doing it and the job market wasn’t great. I asked the help of a guidance counselor when I realized that I needed to completely reconsider my future. I remembered that during med school, I followed a class on bioethics and initiation to law. It was really interesting and new for me, and I thought that it was worth trying. I also remembered a guidance test that I took in High school that guided me towards law studies. I always wanted to do long studies and I knew it was risky but I really wanted to try and I’m glad I did.”

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